Motto:  The reflection of the physical environment of the artist 
expresses the essence of 
 the spiritual beauty of the human being.  Creative art offers the highest value of pure spiritual meaning.


Summary of Chapters



Chapter I:  	In this bright landscape.
		Oil paintings, 1950-1960 ………………………………………..…….p. 5

At the start of 
his career David Caftori painted forms and surfaces in an organic and constructive manner as a reflection of visual-landscape descriptions accompanied by abstract ideas.  His way seemed to be effective for describing sensory impressions and abstract visual thinking pro

cess; a meeting place between reality and ideas and their mixture on the canvas.  The colors were spread with different textures and thickness of strong brush and knife strokes.  The power of the Israeli light influenced Caftori to dilute the strength of 

the colors and find a kaleidoscopic balance between them.
The composition of his paintings represented the main ingredient in the construction of the painting; a flat work of art joined structure by structure.  The drawing line accompanied much of the fig

ures.  It thus served as a unifying force in the design without escaping outside the canvas’ border.  A harmonic combination of colors helped in the painting.  Clean and soft, the light infiltrated from every painting.  Hardly any shadow was to be found. 

 Figures and symbolic shapes filled a great part of the canvas, completing the composition. 
This style of painting characterized the early years of Caftori while he lived in Tel-Aviv.





Chapter II:  	Like clay in the artist’s hand.
		Oil paintings, 19

60-1970 …………………………………………….p. 13

Most of this second period (1961-1969) Caftori spent in Paris.  The challenge facing him was his continued struggle with the power of light; not only by the softening of the color but the general change in his palette.  Th

e choice fell on black and white, and the tension and opposition between them.  The black color won the battle and conquered the canvas.  The white retreated until it disappeared entirely.  A game of dark colors was played through a spectrum of grays till

 black.  Very often other dark colors participated in the gray-black combination.  Embroidery of dark blues or dark reds integrated in the general composition.  The flat composition continued to exist as a main component.  A new constituent has now arrive

d:  “the matter” which added a new dimension to the suggestive expression; a mystical and archaic dimension.
The addition of new media such as sand, cement, iron bars, asphalt, and cloth of different varieties – from silk and wool to burlap and soft velou

r, fitting the relative shapes, characterize the early sixties.  This addition is a kind of collage built on a different texture, which stops tensions and strong oppositions of soft and hard materials.  Light disappears totally and the problem is resolved

 through shadows created by the medium itself.
Caftori’s departure from Paris did not change the essence of the composition of his paintings but the selection of colors and materials:  The black monochrome gave way to browns, reds and blues, greens and pu

rples.  The components of the collage were replaced by a more unifying medium – cement and sand mainly.





Chapter III:	“Black and White”
		Drawings, 1960-1980 ……………………………………………      p. 29








Chapter IV:	In the Water’s Mirror.
		Water colors, 1966-

1999 …………………………………………     p. 45


Throughout time painting with water colors on different kinds of paper represented for Caftori a refined and light expression.  Water colors by their nature, are transparent, clear, pure, and fresh like spring water.  Caf

tori never stopped painting in watercolors in the periods where he also used oil and other media.  Watercolors represented the other side of the static material and served a special means for expressing the translucence of the medium.  The usage of waterc

olors emphasized the clarity of colors, light and wind.  Whether in a colored or pencil drawing watercolors were used as an added structure and very often as a guiding force in an ink drawing, or as a totally independent structure, without any link to the

 colored spot.
Watercolors form a bridge between materials such as oil and pastels, which are the main tools of expression in Caftori’s paintings.




Chapter V:	 “Space shapes”
		Oil paintings, 1970-1999 …………………………………………….p. 55


With Caftori’s return fr

om Paris to Israel in 1969, the light motif again took center stage in the painting.  The collage of materials gave way to shapes in space and space itself.  The balanced composition or the one with internal figurative tension gave way to constructivism w

ith the characteristics of clean surfaces bordered by different by different geometrical figures like the circle, square, or triangle.  Space and light were caught through these graphical structures which integrated with each other or overlapped parts of 

some.  The surfaces themselves imprisoned space by means of shapes and the contradiction between light and dark colors.  The painting was no longer monochrome and returned to be harmoniously colorful.  
The geometric structure was also expressed by the si

ze of the canvas.  An entire series of paintings was made on a 1x1 squared meter or 1.5x1.5 m canvases.  On the other hand a small series of 50x60 cm paintings continued the collage, but this time using only paper on canvas.  The paper was printed with te

xt or hand written and used as a background or as an integral part of the canvas and color.  The shapes continued to have a constructivist geometric line.  The colors were limited by their basic number.





Chapter VI:	The softness of the medium
		Pastel

s, 1970-1999, ………………………………………………      p. 67
 

Oil pastels, which are colorful crayons, have become a most important means of expression, just like soft and liquid oil paints, or any other medium with its varied qualities.  The painting is done on white o

r colored paper; the subject matter returns to nature.  It is drawn from the physical and spiritual climate in the country in the abstract way by means of spots and figures.




Chapter VII:	The strength of the color
		Oil paintings, 1970-1990, …………………………

……………… P. 73


Opposing and sometimes different colored surfaces create the abstraction.  At times a pencil or pastel drawing joins in with a trembling line, sensitive or powerful, direct and full of elan.
This is the way the painting matter offers a pers

onal and actual character to the untimely abstract nature.



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